U.S. Navy Media Blog

Sharing the latest in digital media trends, tools, and techniques to promote continuous knowledge sharing and innovation among Navy communicators across the globe. How are you telling the Navy's story?
Posts I Like
Who I Follow

by Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Eric J. Harrison, OIC, Navy Public Affairs Support Element, Det. Northwest

“Hey, Senior. It’s LT Raelson from CHINFO. How are you doing today?”

Most times when I get a call out of the blue like that, it raises a flag or two and makes one of my eyebrows arch. Uh oh. Three words pop into my head as a warning: Good Idea Fairy. Chiefs, and all Sailors for that matter, can be funny that way.

“What can I do for you, Sir?” I’m a team player, after all. Mr. Raelson asked if I knew that the famed Seattle Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon was taking place in five days and asked if I’d be willing to do some pre-race work along with the race organizers to work up a Navy tie and then assign a shooter to cover the event and focus on the Sailors who may be running in the race. That, of course, is the hard part.

“Yes, Sir, I sure do. In fact, I have a Sailor assigned to shoot the Navy Band already. They’re one of the bands playing along the route to get the runners pumped. What do you have in mind?” After working through some of the details and deciding what the end state might look like, we embarked on a plan to get as much organic and external coverage of Navy Sailors running in one of the largest long-distance events in the country.

Alas, as the Officer in Charge of the NPASE Detachment in the Pacific Northwest, I have exactly nine Sailors under my charge, spread out between Naval Base Kitsap, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island and Naval Station Everett.

The trick, of course, would be to engage the major players in the region to find the Sailors who would be running that Saturday, mixed with a little luck to find some who would be willing to share their stories. I rang the bell, and luckily, I got some great responses from commands, including Naval Hospital Bremerton (NHB) and, of course, USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), among others. Doug Stutz, NHB PAO and seasoned long distance runner, responded right away with the story of a Senior Chief Hospital Corpsman who would be running, and had only recently put together a run for the crew at the hospital to honor those who were deployed worldwide. A few others trickled in, until finally, the Stennis Media team jumped right in with a handful of Sailors who were ready to both run the race, and to offer up their images and stories to the cause. Ensign Josh Kelsey, Stennis Media’s division officer, engaged their team to shoot studio imagery of the Sailors and get quick sound-bite style quotes to go along with them. LT Raelson’s social media contact at Competitor Group (the organizers of the marathon series) even posted these Sailors’ stories on their “Rock Blog.”  We were on our way to getting this done!

Often, in our quest to tell the stories of our Sailors and the Navy, it’s easy to get caught up in the flow of our busy schedules, and resort to tried and true journalism: an event is happening, we assign a Sailor to write a story and shoot photos, we publish in whatever outlet we have, and that’s it. Less often, we prime the pump and produce content in advance of a story like this and gain some momentum and coverage beforehand to maximize the effort and distribution of the story. This impressed me. But not nearly as much as what happened next.

The day of the race, young MC3 Will Blees was on scene bright and early to cover the event from as many aspects as he was able. This included trying to find the Sailors from the carrier Stennis, whom he had never met in person, and capture imagery of them running the race, and then after they crossed the finish line. The U.S. Navy’s Junior Mass Communication Specialist of the Year was all over it and knocked it out with ease. Within two hours of the conclusion of the race, he had the images edited, the captions written and had sent them along to me for review and release to Navy Media Content Services, the Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System, and to the social media team at CHINFO, which is led by Mr. Jason Kelly. Soon thereafter, the content was being spread out through several media outlets, on both a local level and a Navy-wide level.

It was immediately posted on the Navy Region Northwest News site, from where it was shared by the region Facebook and Twitter feeds, and the Stennis Facebook page, where it got 250 likes and 14 shares, adding to the 677 unique views on the region WordPress post. As soon as the story and images got to Jason Kelly and his team, they tweeted out our involvement in the race, which provided a huge level of coverage.

In the end, the biggest takeaways I got from the event coverage:

  • Think ahead and coordinate. Get out in front of it with content to front load what’s going to be happening, when possible. Having the Stennis Media team and NHB help gather the participants and produce content was absolutely vital in telling this story and gaining momentum BEFORE the actual event even happened.
  • Think Local; Act Big Navy. And vice versa. This has always been my concept of operations, from the time I joined the PA community in 2002. My very first PAO, CDR Scott Miller, and my first Chief, Master Chief Melissa Weatherspoon ingrained that concept in my head from the very beginning, and it has proven itself effective communication time and time again. And it worked here, of course.
  • Multi-pronged distribution. This was clearly a key to the success in coverage with the Seattle Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon, and the participation by our Sailors. LT Raelson had it right from the beginning, and it worked perfectly. PLAN to use different outlets, across different commands (when possible) to help to distribute content to your audiences. In this case, we had the robust Stennis Facebook page (40,000+ fans,) and of course, the inherently well-liked and followed @usnavy Twitter feed. On top of that, the coordination with the organization that put on the event itself was the kicker. Well thought out, and well executed.
  • Smash Paradigms. In our line of work it can be easy to fall into the trap of being risk-averse and to paint by the numbers. We grow suspicious of ‘good ideas’. However, the media world in which we are operating these days doesn’t follow many of the rules a lot of us were taught in the years leading up it. The ‘paradigms’ we have set for ourselves through the many years of doing what we do, more and more, need to be smashed in order to keep up in this new media environment. Keep an open mind, and listen to any and all ideas that come your way, from the most junior MC or PAO out of DINFOS, to the most senior chiefs and officers. What may appear to be a Good Idea Fairy may actually be a hammer-wielding paradigm smasher. Go with it, and give it a chance. I’m very happy and more than satisfied with the way this event coverage turned out, thanks to the many expert folks who had a hand in it, and led by LT Raelson’s excellent idea and direction.

By Navy Social Media Team

Operations security (OPSEC) should be maintained online just as it is offline. OPSEC violations commonly occur when personnel share information with people they do not know well or are unaware of loose privacy settings. Focus on communicating these four key tips with Sailors and personnel to avoid OPSEC violations at your command. 

  1. Protect your families by limiting the amount and type of information you post about family members such as names, addresses, local towns or, schools.
  2. Understand each of your social network’s security settings so you can make informed decisions about who is and is not able to view your information and/or photos.
  3. Keep classified and sensitive information safe by not discussing critical information such as ship movements, deployments, personnel rosters, and weapons information.
  4. If you hesitate when deciding whether you should share information, don’t post it online! If you or another person identifies a potential OPSEC breech, document and remove it as soon as possible.

Many times, OPSEC breeches are a result of error or ignorance, so it’s important to communicate with the individual who posted the information to inform him/her of the violation. Work with your public affairs officer and ombudsman to further communicate OPSEC guidelines with sailors and their families.

OPSEC Checklist

Take the following steps to avoid OPSEC breeches at your command.

  1. Identify personnel authorized to post content to social media sites and ensure they are the only individuals with access to those sites.
  2. Establish local procedures to ensure that all information posted on social media is releasable.
  3. Ensure all information posted is in accordance with local public affairs guidance and Navy Public Affairs Regulations.
  4. Monitor your command’s social media sites for posts that violate OPSEC and if there is a violation, remove the information.
  5. Conduct periodic training with Sailors and families on appropriate versus inappropriate social media behavior.

If you have any questions, contact the Navy Social Media Team at 703-614-9154 or socialmedia@navy.mil.

By Jason Kelly (@JasonKellyPAO)
U.S. Navy Emerging Media Director

Get ready for changes to your Facebook Page.

Facebook says it is rolling out “a streamlined look for Pages on desktop that will make it easier for people to find the information they want and help Page admins find the tools they use most.”

Changes include:

  • Updated Page timeline design. Page posts now appear on the right column of the timeline. Facebook says the design allows posts to appear consistently on Pages and Newsfeed. Organizational information, photos and videos now appear on the left column of the timeline.
  • Admin tools. Pages to Watch allows Page admins to create a list of Pages similar to their own and compare the Pages’ performance.

Before:

After:

Want to learn more about the changes? Facebook has put together a list of frequently asked questions about the changes.

If you have any questions, contact the Navy Emerging Media Team at 703-614-9154 or socialmedia@navy.mil.


By Jason Kelly (@JasonKellyPAO)
U.S. Navy Emerging Media Director

Your new Twitter profile is here – if you are ready for it.

For now, you need to opt-in to the design.

Before…

image

After…

image

These are the six things you need to know to get ready:

image

  1. Profile photo: The recommended size is 400x400 pixels. The image is automatically resized to fit. Twitter recommends uploading a GIF or PNG for vector-based and line art images, and uploading a JPG or PNG for photo-based images (raster images).
  2. Header photo: Upload a prominent header image; the background image will no longer display on your profile page. The recommended header photo size is 1500x500 pixels. The image is automatically resized to fit and cropped to a 2:1 aspect ratio on mobile.
  3. Bio: Your bio is limited to 160 characters and displayed on your profile header under your name and username. For official Twitter accounts, be sure to use the Navy social media disclaimer.
  4. Pinned Tweet: Highlight your best content at the top of your profile timeline. Click on the “more” option on the Tweet you want to pin and select “Pin to your profile page.”
  5. Tweet previews: Photo and player Cards appear directly on your profile, and Vine videos automatically play.
  6. Best Tweets highlighted: Tweets that get people talking are bigger in size.

If you have any questions, contact the Navy Emerging Media Team at 703-614-9154 or usnsocialmedia@gmail.com.

By Naval History and Heritage Command Public Affairs 

The U.S. Naval War College Library in Newport, R.I. on Feb. 24, 2014 unveiled online the 4,000-page “Gray Book” collection of Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz' communications beginning in the wake of the Pearl Harbor attack and running up until the closing days of the war. The event, produced by the Naval War College and carried live on the Navy Live Blog, was the culmination of an extensive communication plan requiring the efforts of commands around the world.

Although every public engagement is different, they all offer opportunities to learn from what went well, and what might have been done differently.  Following the engagement, we worked with the half dozen commands involved to put together this comprehensive review of the entire process.  We thought we’d share our experience with you.  Please let us know what you think!

By Jason Kelly (@JasonKellyPAO)
U.S. Navy Emerging Media Director

Expect a new look for your Twitter profile.

Twitter announced a new profile design Tuesday that it says will make it “even easier … to express yourself through a new and improved web profile.”

The Facebook Page-like profile allows the use of a larger profile picture and header photo as well as:

  • Best Tweets: Tweets with more engagement appear slightly larger.
  • Pinned Tweet: Pin a tweet to the top of your page.
  • Filtered Tweets: Select which timeline to view on other users’ profiles – Tweets, Tweets with photos/videos, Tweets and replies.

Right now, the new profile is available to a small group of users, including new users. Twitter says it will roll out the new features to everyone over the coming weeks.

How should you prepare for the transition? Stay tuned for more information.

If you have any questions, contact the Navy Emerging Media Team at 703-614-9154 or usnsocialmedia@gmail.com.

By Sandy Gall
U.S. Navy Emerging Media

Responding to fan questions and comments is one of the most challenging, rewarding and important jobs for a social media manager like me. Finding the right words, staying on message and the sheer volume of comments can make the task daunting. But the best social media managers don’t shy away because they know that managing a social media site like Facebook, Twitter or Instagram is more than simply posting great content – it’s about the engagement – the two-way conversations – this is what makes social media such a powerful communication medium.

As managers of the Navy’s social media accounts, sometimes a reader’s post draws special attention. When a fan leaves a comment reporting a sexual assault, as community managers, we must respond – and we must ensure this person understands where to go for help.

Whether you are in a leadership position or not, if a shipmate of yours reported a sexual assault while you were on deployment, you would respond and you would begin the standardized Navy process necessary to get your shipmate the assistance they need. The same standards apply for social media managers, except, we can’t directly see to it that our shipmate goes to medical. However, we can standardize our responses in an effort to make sure each person reporting sexual assault is directed to the correct and most useful resources to ensure every Sailor and every victim who reports sexual assault is treated with dignity, respect, and professionalism they deserve.

As you can imagine, the US Navy Facebook page receives a lot of fan comments and inbox messages. We try to read and respond to as many possible, but we make it a point to respond to all reports of sexual assault. Victim response is critical and victim reporting is vital. When a Sailor or Navy family member reports an incident via your social media pages, it is your duty to direct them to the right resources.

When responding to a report of sexual assault on your command social media platform take the following steps:

Once you have responded to and provided resources to the victim, record the incident in your internal records. It is critical for the investigation to ensure that all records of reporting are on file. US Navy’s emerging media team has a password protected file where we keep screen shots of the report and our response.

 image

Sexual assault is a serious crime and the Navy is committed to eliminating it within our ranks. Sexual assault prevention and response is an all hands effort; we – as social media managers –  can do our part by directing people to the services at their disposal.

If you have any questions, contact the team at usnsocialmedia@gmail.com or 703-614-9154. 

Editor’s note: Additional blogs about sexual assault prevention and response are available on Navy Live blogs at http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2013/12/18/navy-sexual-assault-prevention-improve-victim-response/ and http://navylive.dodlive.mil/2014/01/15/creating-a-command-climate-intolerant-of-sexual-assault/

By Jason Kelly (@JasonKellyPAO)
U.S. Navy Emerging Media Director

What is Twitter?   

Twitter describes itself as “a social broadcast network that helps you create and share ideas and information instantly without barriers.”   

How long is a tweet? 

Tweets are limited to 140 characters, but  you shouldn’t use all of them. Save at least 20 characters to allow people to retweet or comment. 

What makes Twitter different? 

Twitter is real-time. People share news, events and conversations that are relevant as they’re happening.

What are some common Twitter terms? 

  • Mention (@): Bring a tweet to someone’s  attention by using their username.  If you want to start a tweet with someone’s  username and want all of your followers to  see it, put a period before the username.  Otherwise, only users who follow both you  and the other person will see it. 
  • Retweet (RT): Share a tweet with all of your followers. 
  • Modified tweet (MT): Manually retweet  a message with modifications such  as shortening a tweet. If you think of retweeting as quoting, a modified tweet is paraphrasing. 
  • Hashtag: The # symbol, called a hashtag, marks keywords or topics in a tweet. The use of excessive #hashtags #looks #bad and is a #common #mistake. Try to use no more than two hashtags per tweet and hashtag with a purpose. Frequently used @USNavy hashtags are #USNavy, #Breaking, #NavySAPR, #PartnershipsMatter, #PresenceMatters, #PeopleMatter and  #PowerMatters. Hashtags also are supported on Facebook  and Google+. 
  • Direct message (DM): A private message that only you and the recipient can see. 
  • Follow: Subscribe to someone’s tweets in your timeline.

Should you link your Facebook page to your Twitter account and automatically post from Facebook to Twitter?

No, this is a common mistake that prevents  the Navy Emerging Media Team from using these tweets because of the following reasons: 

  • Facebook posts that are automatically shared on Twitter are frequently truncated   since they are often longer than 140 characters.
  • Twitter uses unique terms as above explained. 
  • Social networks attract different users.  Some content may be more appealing to one network’s audience than another audience. For example, news articles on the Navy’s Twitter account usually receive more user engagement than on the Navy’s Facebook page.

Take the time to understand the similarities and differences between your audience on each social network. If you take the time to properly use Twitter, you’ll see more engagement and a greater return on investment. 

Is Twitter right for every command? 

No, but it is definitely worth considering.   If your unit or command isn’t on Twitter, you’re likely missing an opportunity to reach your audience. 

What should I do to get started? 

If you aren’t familiar with Twitter, create a personal account and use it until you become comfortable with Twitter. When you are ready to use it as a command   or unit, review the Navy’s social media registration checklist at www.Navy.mil/media/smrChecklist.pdf, create your unit’s Twitter account and register it at www.Navy.mil/CommandDirectory.asp

You may be surprised how you can reach more people by saying less – in no more than 140 characters.

If you have any questions, contact the team at usnsocialmedia@gmail.com or 703-614-9154. 

By Naval History and Heritage Command Public Affairs

The Naval History and Heritage Command publicly unveiled its new logo on Feb. 27, 2014.

It was the culmination of a nearly year-long process to create a graphic that accurately represented the command’s mission, builds internal and public support and understanding for NHHC and Navy history, and could be easily duplicated and recognized in a variety of sizes and resolutions across the widest number of mediums. 

We believe we succeeded. Whether you agree or not, we wanted to share some of the lessons we learned in the process that you might be able to use if you’re considering a similar endeavor. Let us know if you have any questions or feedback.

By Jason Kelly (@JasonKellyPAO)
U.S. Navy Emerging Media Director

1) Keep your posts short. 

image

While the statistics vary slightly, shorter Facebook posts tend to do better than longer posts. Try to keep your posts to less than 80 to 100 characters or about three lines of text. 

2) Be conversational. 

image

Remember you aren’t writing a www. Navy.mil story or a news release; you’re writing for social media. Use short, concise and easy to understand sentences. Avoid acronyms. 

3) Use an image with your post. 

Social media continues to become an ever-increasing visual experience. Look at your own newsfeed, which is where the majority of Facebook users see content. Your newsfeed is likely filled with images. Instead of just posting a status update with text, use an image related to your post and what would’ve been your text update as your caption. 

4) Rewrite your captions. 

image

There’s a right way to caption photos for www.Navy.mil, and there’s a right way to caption photos for social media. Remember to make your caption short and conversational. Consider starting your caption with a short phrase that summarizes the photo. You’re competing for people’s attention; grab it. 

5) Engage with your audience. 

image

Social media should be social. Ask a question and be prepared to answer it. If you don’t know the answer, tell the user you’re researching it. Your audience will appreciate knowing that you aren’t ignoring the question. 

6) Have a call to action. 

image

Do you want your audience to like something, talk about it, share it or visit a link? If so, say it in your post. 

7) Experiment with content. 

Facebook Insights, which are available to administrators of a page with at least 30 likes, provides metrics about your page’s performance. Regularly review Insights to determine what content is performing the best, when your audience is online, and how it is engaging with your content. 

8) Mix it up. 

Post a variety of content: news about or relevant to your command, links, photos and videos. Your Facebook page isn’t your command website. Don’t treat it like one by just posting text status updates. 

9) Draft your content. 

Write your posts in a program that allows you to spell check them. You wouldn’t send a news release without spell checking it. Review your content and then hit post. 

10) Be professional. 

Remember your Facebook page represents your command and the U.S. Navy. The principles of security, accuracy, propriety and policy apply to social media.

If you have any questions, contact the team at usnsocialmedia@gmail.com or 703-614-9154.

By Jason Kelly (@JasonKellyPAO)

U.S. Navy Emerging Media Director

The Navy Live blog (http://navylive.dodlive.mil/) – the official blog of the U.S. Navy – tells the story of America’s Navy through individual perspectives. The blog features varying perspectives from the greater Navy community through posts by leaders, Sailors, family members, subject matter experts and other relevant stakeholders. In many ways, it is the hub of the Navy’s flagship social media sites because it allows us to have a longer conversation that wouldn’t be possible in just a post or tweet.

So, what makes a great Navy Live blog?

WRITE IN FIRST PERSON This is your Navy story. Be yourself because authenticity matters. If you are ghost writing, sync your writing style with the author’s voice.

BE CONVERSATIONAL The best social media content establishes a connection between the author and the audience. You can do this by writing conversationally and avoiding acronyms. Imagine you’re talking to a complete stranger about your blog’s topic. Make your blog easy to understand. We edit blogs so they use plain-writing and AP styles.

Be Timely. Social media users want to know what’s happening now. Contact the Navy’s Emerging Media Team at 703-614-9154 or usnsocialmedia@gmail.com in advance of an event or known issue to discuss a possible blog. We can help you develop your blog.

Know Your Audience. Navy Live blogs discuss issues on a “big Navy” level. That doesn’t mean issues at a local level can’t translate into a Navy Live blog. USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72)’s blog about the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address is a great example of a timely blog that translated a command-level issue into something more. Check it out at http://1.usa.gov/1fMZJds.

Be Visual. Another thing that made Lincoln’s blog great was its use of imagery. It went beyond just text. The blog also included a video of Lincoln’s Sailors reciting the Gettysburg Address line by line.

Blogs should be a good mix of text and imagery. If you’re submitting a Navy Live blog, send the high-resolution photos that you want used or include the photos’ VIRINs. Be sure to include the photos’ captions as well. Let us know if you want to include a video and need help transmitting it.

Include links. Did you pull a fact from an outside source? Does your command have a website? Include those links in your blog where you want them used.

Give us a preview. We want your blog to be successful. We request that you send us a draft – especially if you are ghost writing – before you get it approved. It is a lot easier to provide feedback while the blog is still being written.

Have a call to action. Ask a question or invite readers to leave comments and plan to reply to them. Email us the response and we’ll post it as “U.S. Navy.” This gives the response credibility.

Can readers get additional information? Tell them how to do it.

If you have any questions, contact the team at usnsocialmedia@gmail.com or 703-614-9154.

By Jason Kelly (@JasonKellyPAO)

U.S. Navy Emerging Media Director

It’s no longer a question of if, but how Navy commands should use social media. The latest Navy Imagery Insider focuses on answering that question. It is important to know that there is no cookie-cutter solution.

Your social media sites should be an integral part of your command’s communication strategy. Before launching a social media site for your command, consider what you want to accomplish. What are your communication objectives and how do they move your command closer to achieving its mission?

You should consider your command’s audiences. Do you want to communicate with Sailors in your command, command leadership, family members, the local community, a broader Department of Defense audience, the American public, or another group altogether?

Just like other parts of your communication strategy, you should adapt your social media plan as your communication objectives change.

In fiscal year 2013, the Navy Emerging Media Program focused on reaching so-called one-offs, such as a Sailor’s family members, veterans and people who have an established interest in the Navy. This year, the program is looking for opportunities to provide context to the American public – especially people who don’t have a connection to the Navy – about what the Navy is doing and why the Navy is doing it.

This strategy doesn’t mean the Navy’s flagship social media sites aren’t communicating to those one-offs, Sailors and journalists. We’re still reaching those audiences through our content.

We’re tailoring our best practices to accomplish our goal. In this Insider, we share best practices for some of the most popular social media sites. I encourage you to adapt them for your command and visit the Navy Media Tumblr page at http://usnavymedia.tumblr.com for regular updates. As always, you may contact the emerging media team at 703-614- 9154 or usnsocialmedia@gmail.com for additional assistance.

Download the Navy Imagery Insider Fall-Winter 2013 issue. 

By Jason Kelly (@JasonKellyPAO)

U.S. Navy Emerging Media Director

"Just the facts, ma’am" isn’t just a catchphrase from the show Dragnet. It’s an important part of plain writing.

Two Facebook posts caught my attention today for giving its audience just the facts. Both posts were from MCM Crew Dominant. Take a look. 

image

image

The captions are remarkably easy to understand. There’s no doubt about what’s happening and why it’s important.

This is especially important in social media when you are competing for both your audience’s attention and characters within your own posts.

Think about how you use social media. There’s a good chance that you quickly scroll through your Facebook Newsfeed or tweets to see what’s happening. I frequently encourage social media writers to think like their audience. 

Ask yourself who is your audience and where are they consuming your content. Let’s use a photo as an example. Is your photo for an internal publication that is read by people who are familiar with all of the terms and acronyms in the caption? Or is it social media? You don’t have to use the same caption across all platforms. 

image

 Navy.mil caption: 

SAN DIEGO (Jan. 15, 2014) Ensign Dolph Eich, left, Ensign Charles Hasenbank and Ensign Kelly Reightler, receive their surface warfare officer (SWO) pins during a ceremony aboard the littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1). Cmdr. Timothy Wilke, Freedom’s commanding officer, presided over the ceremony that marked the first group of U.S. Navy ensigns to earn their initial SWO qualification aboard the LCS platform. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Donnie W. Ryan/Released)

Possible social media post: 

Congratulate these history makers!

These three are the first group of #USNavy ensigns to earn their initial surface warfare qualification aboard the littoral combat ship platform. http://1.usa.gov/1fKEABC

It sounds obvious, but social media should be social. Write like you’re talking with your audience - not at your audience.

Visit PlainLanguage.gov if you want to learn more about plain writing.

If you have any questions, contact the team at usnsocialmedia@gmail.com or 703-614-9154.

By LT Chika Onyekanne
U.S. Navy Emerging Media

You may already understand the importance of social media when it comes to getting information out, but do you use it as much as you should to speak to your audience?

The Pew Research Center’s Internet Project conducted a 2013 survey on social media usage among online adults and how the social media platforms compare to each other. The survey compared Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and LinkedIn. Pew surveyed 1,801 adults, all at least 18 years old.

We all know that when it comes to the number of users, Facebook is king.

Percentage of online adults who use: 

  • 71 percent of online adults are on Facebook
  • 22 percent on LinkedIn
  • 21 percent on Pinterest
  • 18 percent on Twitter
  • 17 percent on Instagram.

Even though Facebook had a slight head start, the disparity is quite large. It shows you have the potential to reach the most people on a single social media platform by using Facebook. 

For public affairs professionals, it’s not enough that users (potential audience) are on these platforms. They also need to engage frequently on social media for us to truly benefit in getting our messages seen. Among Facebook users, 63 percent visit the site at least once a day while 40 percent visit multiple times a day.  The numbers are slightly lower for Instagram (57 percent  daily, 35 percent multiple times) and Twitter (46 percent daily, 29 percent multiple times).  Looking at this, we see yet another reason to engage on social media, especially Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. From the number of users for these platforms, about half visit the site daily.

When it came to the use of multiple platforms by online adult, 42 percent used two or more.  36 percent used only one platform and out of that number 84 percent chose Facebook, 8 percent use LinkedIn, 4 percent use Pinterest, and 2 percent use Instagram or Twitter. 

As you start or continue to use social media to tell your story, think about using multiple platforms. It will give you a better opportunity to reach more people and different demographics. If you can only use one for whatever reason, as of 2013, Facebook is still king.

If you have any questions, contact the team at usnsocialmedia@gmail.com or 703-614-9154.